How progressive campaigns are won in the 21st Century

This is an interesting site innovating social strategy for non-profit campaign organisations. Download their latest free report from netchange.co.

Summary

Social change is hard, and harder still if our institutions haven’t adapted to the cultural changes of our networked society and the complexity of the world’s wicked problems.

The Networked Change Report maps out the strategies and practices that made 47 of today’s most successful advocacy campaigns work while so many others failed to create lasting change.

These campaigns achieved success, we found, because of their ability to open up to the new cultural forces which favor open-ness and grassroots power, but also because they framed and strategically directed this power towards concrete policy outcomes. In short, these “directed network campaigns” married old power with new.

With a special focus on directed-network campaigns, the report isolates the strategic and operational approaches that were common to all high performing examples in our case studies.

Simply put, our intention is to accelerate innovations that work. Understanding and implementing these principles and approaches will allow organizers to apply a model that is consistently achieving high impact and force amplification in today’s challenging advocacy landscape.

“The conventional rules of organizing and the practice of building institutions to create change is being replaced by the demand to innovate and spark new connections and a mandate to build platforms that allow for participation and self determination. This report examines and connects the dots between emergent strategies and provides concrete mechanisms to adapt and improve social change efforts.” 

Marisa Franco, Director of the Not1More Deportation Campaign 

The report is available for free download.

 

The impact of responsive design on online giving (Infographic)

An increasing number of charities and non-profits are recognising the advantages of updating their websites to responsive web design. This is because responsive sites provide an optimal viewing and interaction experience – easy reading and navigation with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling – across a wide range of devices, from desktop computer monitors to mobile phones. Which in turn helps generate a significantly better rate on converting a site visit into an action, whether signing a petition or making a donation.

According to Pew Research, 63% of adult cell owners use their phones to go online, as of May 2013, and 34% of cell internet users go online mostly using their phones, and not using some other device such as a desktop or laptop computer.

Not only is your audience accessing your website from their mobile device or tablet, they’re also giving more money on sites that are responsive. Blakcbaud determined this after they researched 105 small and mid-sized randomly selected nonprofits and conducted an analysis on almost 5,000 donations processed by Blackbaud’s Online Express between August 26th and October 25th of 2014.

Key findings from the research include:

> Donors were 34% more likely to make a gift after reaching a donation form when the website was responsive.
> The average gift size increased on responsive sites.
> Conversions were 59% higher for mobile donors one responsive websites.
> Of the 105 non-profits that npENGAGE evaluated manually, 42% had responsive sites. That’s only 56 organisations.

 
 Responsive design infographic