How progressive campaigns are won in the 21st Century

This is an interesting site innovating social strategy for non-profit campaign organisations. Download their latest free report from netchange.co.

Summary

Social change is hard, and harder still if our institutions haven’t adapted to the cultural changes of our networked society and the complexity of the world’s wicked problems.

The Networked Change Report maps out the strategies and practices that made 47 of today’s most successful advocacy campaigns work while so many others failed to create lasting change.

These campaigns achieved success, we found, because of their ability to open up to the new cultural forces which favor open-ness and grassroots power, but also because they framed and strategically directed this power towards concrete policy outcomes. In short, these “directed network campaigns” married old power with new.

With a special focus on directed-network campaigns, the report isolates the strategic and operational approaches that were common to all high performing examples in our case studies.

Simply put, our intention is to accelerate innovations that work. Understanding and implementing these principles and approaches will allow organizers to apply a model that is consistently achieving high impact and force amplification in today’s challenging advocacy landscape.

“The conventional rules of organizing and the practice of building institutions to create change is being replaced by the demand to innovate and spark new connections and a mandate to build platforms that allow for participation and self determination. This report examines and connects the dots between emergent strategies and provides concrete mechanisms to adapt and improve social change efforts.” 

Marisa Franco, Director of the Not1More Deportation Campaign 

The report is available for free download.

 

Let’s put nature at the heart of everyday economic life

A brilliant piece in the Guardian.

Natural capital is everything nature provides us for free. It is what our economy is built upon. We add man-made capital in the shape of houses, factories, offices and physical infrastructure, and human capital with our skills, ideas and science.

Natural capital should, therefore, be at the heart of economics and economic policy – but it isn’t. As a consequence we abuse nature, drive species to extinction, and destroy ecosystems and habitats without much thought to the consequences. The damage won’t go away; as we wipe out perhaps half the species on the planet this century and induce significant climate change, the economic growth we take for granted will be seriously impaired. Put simply, our disregard for natural capital is unsustainable – it will not be sustained.

Continue reading here.