Rebirth of the not-magazine?

Facebook is joining a whole list of companies, from Airbnb, Asos, Casper, Dollar Shave Club to Net-a-Porter in publishing a new magazine. Except, it is a not-magazine.

Despite being packaged in the shape of a magazine, bearing all the hallmarks of a magazine and having the words “a quarterly magazine for business leaders” emblazoned on its magazine-like cover, Grow by Facebook is categorically not a magazine according to the Facebook PR team. No – this is, they say, simply a piece of marketing collateral. A brochure even. It’s almost as though Facebook doesn’t want to be called a publisher or something.

Whatever you want to call it, Grow joins an ever-expanding collection of branded publications whose arrival has coincided with major consumer titles such as NME and Teen Vogue closing their print magazines. So why is it that dead tree media is proving so desirable to companies that have built their success on eschewing legacy technology?

“Trust, authority and credibility,” says Terri White, editor-in-chief of film bible Empire. “The digital space is a hectic, loud, cluttered landscape with bloggers, influencers, journalists, editors, writers, marketeers all shouting into the void – their voices surfacing, or not, depending on SEO or algorithms. In such a crowded space, how do you ensure that people trust what they read on your website or social channels versus the other 30-odd people/brands in your area? How does your brand stand out?”


Read the full article on DRUM

Don’t even start typing…

Remember all those Facebook rants you wrote and then wisely deleted before posting? Facebook’s been studying them to better understand your self-censorship behaviour.
That’s right. So even posts you never posted are now being tracked and noted. Big Zuckerberg is taking notes. This pdf report is worth a read.

Facebook Advertising Checklist

When setting up a paid Facebook ad, there are a lot of boxes to be checked.

Are you targeting the right people? Are your image dimensions to scale? Are you running the right type of ad? There is a lot that you need to consider and it can get a little confusing.

With more than 1.4 billion people using Facebook and over 900 million visits every day, Facebook offers up a unique opportunity for marketers to augment their organic efforts. Trouble is, with both an investment of time and money on the line, there’s not much room for oversight.

The Ultimate Checklist for Creating & Optimizing Facebook Ads

Facebook offers a wide variety of paid ad options and placements, but all ads can be broken down into three elements:

  1. Campaigns. The campaign houses all of your assets.
  2. Ad sets. If you’re targeting separate audiences with different characteristics, you’ll need an individual ad set for each.
  3. Ads. Your actual ads live within your ad sets. Each ad set can hold a variety of ads that vary in colour, copy, images, etc.

With that terminology out of the way, let’s get started creating our ad.

“Never write an advertisement which you wouldn’t want your family to read. You wouldn’t tell lies to your own wife. Don’t tell them to mine”
David Ogilvy

Choose an objective

Facebook’s Ads Manager, like many social media advertising networks, is designed with your campaign objective in mind. Before getting started, Ads Manager will prompt you to choose an objective for your campaign:

There are 10 different objectives to choose from. The list includes everything from sending people to your website to getting installs of your app to raising attendance at your event.

By choosing one of these objectives, you’re giving Facebook a better idea of what you’d like to do so they can present you with the best-suited ad options. Facebook’s ad options include:

  • Page Post Engagements
  • Page Likes
  • Click to Website
  • Website Conversions
  • App Installs
  • App Engagement
  • Event Responses
  • Offer Claims
  • Video Views
  • Local Awareness

“Make it simple. Make it memorable. Make it inviting to look at”
Leo Burnett

Choose your audience

If you’re just starting out with paid advertising on Facebook, it’s likely that you’ll have to experiment with several different targeting options until you reach an audience that fits just right.

To help you narrow your focus, Facebook’s targeting criteria are accompanied by an audience definition gauge. This tool — located to the right of the audience targeting fields — takes all of your selected properties into consideration in order to come up with a potential reach number.

If you’re wavering between choosing a specific audience over a broad one, consider your objective. If you’re looking to drive traffic, you’ll probably want to focus on the type of people you know will be interested in your offering. However, if you’re looking to build brand awareness or promote a widely appealing offer, feel free to focus on a more general audience.

Facebook’s built-in targeting is vast, including options such as:

  • Location
  • Age
  • Gender
  • Languages
  • Relationship
  • Education
  • Work
  • Financial
  • Home
  • Ethnic Affinity
  • Generation
  • Parents
  • Politics (U.S. only)
  • Life Events
  • Interests
  • Behaviours
  • Connections
“If you want to understand how a lion hunts, don’t go to the zoo. Go to the jungle.”
Jim Stengel

Set your budget

Facebook offers advertisers the option to set either a daily budget or a lifetime budget. Here’s how they differ from one another:
  • Daily budget. If you want your ad set to run continuously throughout the day, this is the option you’ll want to go for. Using a daily budget means that Facebook will pace your spending per day. Keep in mind that the minimum daily budget for an ad set is $1.00 USD and must be at least 2X your CPC (Cost per Click).
  • Lifetime budget. If you’re looking to run your ad for a specified length of time, select lifetime budget. This means that Facebook will pace your spend over the time period you set for the ad to run.

 

“By definition, remarkable things get remarked upon”
Seth Godin

Create your advert

What do you want your ad to look like? It all depends on your original objective.

If you’re looking to increase the number of clicks to your website, Facebook’s Ad Manager will suggest the Click to Website ad options. Makes sense, right?

This ad option is broken down into two formats: Links and Carousels. Essentially, this means that you can either display a single image ad (Links) or a multi-image ad (Carousel) with three to five scrolling images at no additional cost.

Once you decide between the two, you’ll need to upload your creative assets. It’s important to note that for each type of ad, Facebook requires users to adhere to certain design criteria.

For single image ads, they ask that users adhere to the following considerations:

  • Text: 90 characters
  • Link Title: 25 characters
  • Image ratio: 1.91:1
  • Image size: 1200 pixels x 627 pixels. (Use a minimum image width of 600 pixels for ads appearing in News Feed.)

For multi-image ads — also known as Carousel Ads — Facebook provides the following design recommendations:

  • Recommended image size: 600 x 600 pixels
  • Image ratio: 1:1
  • Text: 90 characters
  • Headline: 40 characters
  • Link description: 20 characters
  • Your image may not include more than 20% text. See how much text is on your image.

Keep in mind that these are the ad options for the “send people to your website” objective.

If you selected “boost your posts,” you’d be presented with different ad options like the Page Post Engagement: Photo ad. This ad has a unique set of design recommendations. To explore all of the ad options and their design specifics, refer to this resource.

Low on design budget and want to make sure that you have met all the parameters? Canva is a great online editor that you can use to pull together a great ad (using your images) that fits within the Facebook image specs!

“In our factory, we make lipstick. In our advertising, we sell hope.”
Peter Nivio Zarlenga

Report on the performance

Once your ads are running, you’ll want to keep an eye on how they’re doing. To see their results, you’ll want to look in two places: the Facebook Ad Manager and your marketing software.

“Stopping advertising to save money is like stopping your watch to save time.”
Henry Ford

Facebook’s Ad Manager

Facebook’s Ad Manager is a sophisticated dashboard that provides users with an overview of all their campaigns.

Upfront, the dashboard highlights an estimate of how much you’re spending each day. The dashboard is organized by columns, which makes it easy to filter through your ads so you can create a custom view of your results. Key numbers like reach, frequency, and cost are readily available, making reporting on performance a no brainer.

According to Facebook, here are some of the key metrics to look for (and their definitions):

  • Performance. Can be customized further to include metrics like results, reach, frequency and impressions
  • Engagement. Can be customized further to include metrics like Page likes, Page engagement and post engagement
  • Videos. Can be customized further to include metrics like video views and avg. % of video viewed
  • Website. Can be customized further to include metrics like website actions (all), checkouts, payment details, purchases and adds to cart
  • Apps. Can be further customized to include metrics like app installs, app engagement, credit spends, mobile app actions and cost per app engagement
  • Events. Can be further customized to include metrics like event responses and cost per event response
  • Clicks. Can be further customized to include metrics like clicks, unique clicks, CTR (click-through rate) and CPC (cost per click)
  • Settings. Can be further customized to include metrics like start date, end date, ad set name, ad ID, delivery, bid and objective

Tracking URLs will help you keep track of how many leads, or better yet, how many customers you’ve gained from your advertising efforts. This information is useful in determining the ROI of this source, and can also be used to inform your targeting strategy.

There are great resources to make sure that you didn’t miss anything during the Facebook Ad planning process. Share your Facebook advertising stories in the comments – I hope that this guide is useful!

“Doing business without advertising is like winking at a girl in the dark. You know what you are doing, but nobody else does”
Steuart Henderson Britt

Article written by  |  Content and Social Media Officer at University of Oxford

 

A fundraising success checklist for nonprofits

 This is a pretty comprehensive list of fundraising success checklist for nonprofits. If you’d like any help. tips or advice, do get in touch

Mobile and Social Fundraising Strategic Plan

  • Conduct an online communications and fundraising audit.
  • Organize a meeting to ensure organizational buy-in.
  • Write a mobile and social fundraising strategic plan.
  • Create a budget.
  • Create a system to track and report on success.
  • Implement your strategic plan.

Websites

  • Decide whether to launch a new responsively designed website, to mobile-optimize your current site, or launch a separate mobile website.
  • Select a Content Management System (CMS) and hosting service.
  • Hire a website and graphic designer.
  • Write content and secure photos for all website pages.
  • Launch a blog inside your website.
  • Prominently feature a “Donate” button and social network icons on your home page and every page of your website and blog.
  • Add an e-newsletter subscription form to your home page and every page of your website and blog.
  • Add social sharing and comment functionality.
  • Select a website and blog analytics service.
  • Get master copies of Photoshop files for all website and blog graphics from your designer.
  • Configure your website and blog for search engine optimization (SEO).
  • Test your website on multiple mobile devices before launch.
  • Follow and study the World Wildlife Fund, Sex, Etc., Mercy Corps, Malaria No More, andBest Friends Animal Society.

Email Communications

  • Select an email communication software.
  • Design e-newsletter and email fundraising appeal banner images.
  • Design e-newsletter and email fundraising appeal templates that are mobile compatible.
  • Prominently feature a donate button and social network icons in your e-newsletter and email fundraising appeals.
  • Get master copies of Photoshop files for all e-newsletter graphics from your designer.
  • Add social sharing functionality.
  • Create campaign-specific landing pages for email fundraising campaigns.
  • Create an e-newsletter subscribe page on your website for effective promotion on social networks.
  • Create an e-newsletter subscribe graphic to better promote your e-newsletter on social networks.
  • Experiment with online contests to build your email list.
  • Follow and study UNICEF, SOS Children’s Villages, ONE Campaign, National Park Foundation, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Online Fundraising

  • Select a Constituent Relationship Management (CRM) system.
  • Select an online fundraising software that is mobile compatible.
  • Create a donate page on your website and ensure that the donation process occurs on one page.
  • Set default donation amounts.
  • Add an optional mobile alert opt-in field, if applicable.
  • Add charity rating graphics.
  • Include program versus operating expense graphics.
  • Write and add giving impact statements.
  • Include tribute giving as an option on your donate page.
  • Create a separate donate page for tribute giving for effective promotion in email communications and mobile and social media.
  • Design promotional graphics for your tribute giving campaign for your website, blog, email communications, and social networks.
  • Create an ad for your tribute giving campaign for print materials.
  • Include monthly giving as an option on your donate page.
  • Create a separate donate page for monthly giving for effective promotion in email communications and mobile and social media.
  • Design promotional graphics for your monthly giving campaign for your website, blog, email communications, and social networks.
  • Create an ad for your monthly giving campaign for print materials.
  • Design a “Donate Monthly” button for your monthly giving campaign and add it to your website and blog.
  • Create a system to thank your monthly donors on a regular basis.
  • Ensure that your thank-you landing page includes social network icons, social sharing functionality, and a thank-you video or slideshow.
  • Ensure that your thank-you follow-up email is custom-branded and includes social network icons, social sharing functionality, and a thank-you video or slideshow.
  • Create a “More Ways to Give” page.
  • Create an annual thank-you and program achievement infographic or presentation and include it in your donor thank-you communications.
  • Add your tribute giving and monthly giving campaigns to your “More Ways to Give” page.
  • Follow and study Partners in Health, Feeding America, American Cancer Society, African Wildlife Foundation, and charity: water.

Social Fundraising

  • Select a social fundraising software.
  • Create a fundraising guide for your fundraisers.
  • Offer contests that reward fundraisers who raise the most funds during the campaign.
  • Create an email list solely for fundraisers, and throughout the year keep them updated on the causes that they raised money for.
  • Create a mobile list for fundraisers and occasionally text them fundraising tips and event updates.
  • Design promotional graphics for your social fundraising campaign for your website, blog, email communications, and social networks.
  • Create an ad for your social fundraising campaign for print materials.
  • Design a “Fundraise” button for your social fundraising campaign and add it to your website and blog.
  • Add your social giving campaign to your “More Ways to Give” page.
  • Send follow-up thank-you emails to social fundraising campaign donors with your nonprofit’s branding and social network icons.
  • Send follow-up campaign update emails.

Crowdfunding

  • Select a crowdfunding software.
  • Write your project summary and set up your crowdfunding campaign(s).
  • Donate to your own crowdfunding campaign before launch.
  • Design promotional graphics for your crowdfunding campaign for your website, blog, email communications, and social networks.
  • Create an ad for your crowdfunding campaign for print materials.
  • Add your crowdfunding campaigns to your “More Ways to Give” page.
  • Send follow-up thank-you emails to crowdfunders with your nonprofit’s branding and social network icons.

Mobile Fundraising

  • Select a text-to-give software.
  • Launch a mobile alert campaign.
  • Add a mobile alert subscription form to your home page and every page of your website and blog.
  • Add a mobile alert icon to your website, blog, and e-newsletter and email fundraising appeal templates in proximity to your social networks icons.
  • Add your text-to-give campaign to your “More Ways to Give” page.
  • Create text-to-give and mobile alert promotional graphics for your website, blog, email communications, and social networks.
  • Create ads for your text-to-give and mobile alert campaigns for print materials.
  • Sign up for Google for Nonprofits and Google Wallet.
  • Follow and study the National Wildlife Federation, Humane Society of the United States,Human Rights Campaign, Greenpeace, and the American Red Cross.

Mobile and Social Content Strategy

  • Write a mobile and social content strategy.
  • Create an editorial calendar.

Integrate mobile and social media into…

  • print materials.
  • news articles and press releases.
  • your blog.
  • image and infographic campaigns.
  • video.
  • online petition campaigns.
  • online contests.
  • your online store.
  • e-books and digital reports.
  • smartphone and tablet apps promotions.

Facebook

Twitter

Google+

LinkedIn

YouTube

Pinterest

Instagram

Tumblr

Real-Time Communications and Fundraising

  • Create a system to respond to breaking news and crisis situations.
  • Launch a Cause Awareness Day Campaign.
  • Experiment with live reporting from events and conferences.
  • Experiment with Storify, Share As Image, EventStagram, LiveStream, and Square, if applicable.
  • Download the Studio, Magistro, Evernote, Flipboard, and Foursquare apps, if applicable.

New Media Managers

  • Hire a skilled part- or full-time new media manager or adjust current job descriptions of current staff.
  • Ensure that volunteers and interns are trained in mobile and social media.
  • Learn photo and video editing skills.
  • Learn HTML skills.
  • Build a consistent brand across all your organization’s chapters, if applicable.
  • Build your online brand in multiple time zones, if applicable.
  • Proactively manage mobile and social media burnout.
  • Get master copies of Photoshop files for all social network custom graphics from your designer.
  • Study and mimic the mobile and social fundraising campaigns of large nonprofits similar to yours in mission and programs.

 

Mobile for Good: A How-To Fundraising Guide for Nonprofits

mobile for good look insideBased on more than 20 years of experience and 25,000+ hours spent utilizing mobile and social media, Mobile for Good: A How-To Fundraising Guide for Nonprofits is a comprehensive 256-page book packed with more than 500 best practices. Written on the premise that all communications and fundraising are now mobile and social, Mobile for Good is a step-by-step how-to guide for writing, implementing, and maintaining a mobile and social fundraising strategy for your nonprofit.

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