The environmental doughnut goes youtube

Feeling privileged to have been involved in this project, designing the now famous ‘environmental doughnut‘ graphics.

 

Fascinating Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2017

Data, analysis and visualization on the 17 SDGs

The Atlas is built around World Development Indicators 2017  — the World Bank’s compilation of statistics from over 200 economies about global development and the quality of people’s lives. For each of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, selected indicators have been identified and visualized to analyze trends and challenges, and to stimulate discussion on measurement issues. You can browse the Atlas online here, or download it as a PDF. It is accompanied by interactive dashboards of SDG data and all the underlying data is available in the World Development Indicators database.

Me and the economic doughnut

Not wishing to blow my own trumpet (too much)(again), but this article: Finally, a breakthrough alternative to growth economics – the doughnut by George Monbiot is a bit of an ego boost for me.

This brilliant article explains the genius of Kate Raworth‘s thinking about how, if instead of focusing our economy on constant growth – at all costs – a new economic model would allow us to thrive while saving the planet. An idea surely well worth exploring?

Oh, and while at it, the article also gives credit to my work for the illustrations.

The book is now available to buy from book sellers down your High Street – or online though Hive.co.uk

I wrote an article about the book not too long ago, just before the launch.

 

 

Things that the world worries about…

…or not. Let’s start with the good news: It isn’t all doom and gloom.

In some countries the population is more optimistic than not. The countries include China, Saudi Arabia, India, Argentina, Peru, Canada and Russia.

But…

A sizeable chunk of the world’s population is unhappy with the direction their country is going in, according to a survey that also reveals what people in different nations are most concerned about.

Then again, just as an example, Sweden seems to be worried about homicide – yet it has one of the lowest homicide rates in the world. Which just goes to show that what people are worried about and what they should be worried about doesn’t always tie up.

But, if it makes good headlines, why hold back? Thus, if you keep in mind the Swedish example mentioned above, as you read the World Economic Forums article What are people in your country most worried about?  – you’ll come to realise that there is much less to worry about than suggested.

“Fear nothing but fear itself” comes to mind.

 

When Governments destroy data…

This is an invaluable historic resource: The Internet Archive. Especially when you become aware that the Trump administration has been ‘disappearing‘ so many web pages. From Civil Rights, Climate Change to LGBT Rights’. Mind you, if you start looking around, you may note that many other governments do the same.

Long before the 2016 Presidential election cycle librarians have understood this often-overlooked fact: vast amounts of government data and digital information are at risk of vanishing when a presidential term ends and administrations change.  For example, 83% of .gov pdf’s disappeared between 2008 and 2012. 

That is why the Internet Archive, along with partners from the Library of Congress, University of North Texas, George Washington University, Stanford University, California Digital Library, and other public and private libraries, are hard at work on the End of Term Web Archive, a wide-ranging effort to preserve the entirety of the federal government web presence, especially the .gov and .mil domains, along with federal websites on other domains and official government social media accounts.

While not the only project the Internet Archive is doing to preserve government websites, ftp sites, and databases at this time, the End of Term Web Archive is a far reaching one.

The Internet Archive is collecting webpages from over 6,000 government domains, over 200,000 hosts, and feeds from around 10,000 official federal social media accounts. The effort is likely to preserve hundreds of millions of individual government webpages and data and could end up totaling well over 100 terabytes of data of archived materials. Over its full history of web archiving, the Internet Archive has preserved over 3.5 billion URLs from the .gov domain including over 45 million PDFs.

This end-of-term collection builds on similar initiatives in 2008 and 2012 by original partners Internet Archive, Library of Congress, University of North Texas, and California Digital Library to document the “gov web,” which has no mandated, domain-wide single custodian. For instance, here is the National Institute of Literacy (NIFL) website in 2008. The domain went offline in 2011. Similarly, the Sustainable Development Indicators (SDI) site was later taken down. Other websites, such as invasivespecies.gov were later folded into larger agency domains. Every web page archived is accessible through the Wayback Machine and past and current End of Term specific collections are full-text searchable through the main End of Term portal. We have also worked with additional partners to provide access to the full data for use in data-mining research and projects.

The project has received considerable press attention this year, with related stories in The New York Times, Politico, The Washington Post, Library Journal, Motherboard, and others.

“No single government entity is responsible for archiving the entire federal government’s web presence,” explained Jefferson Bailey, the Internet Archive’s Director of Web Archiving.  “Web data is already highly ephemeral and websites without a mandated custodian are even more imperiled. These sites include significant amounts of publicly-funded federal research, data, projects, and reporting that may only exist or be published on the web. This is tremendously important historical information. It also creates an amazing opportunity for libraries and archives to join forces and resources and collaborate to archive and provide permanent access to this material.”

This year has also seen a significant increase in citizen and librarian driven “hackathons” and “nomination-a-thons” where subject experts and concerned information professionals crowdsource lists of high-value or endangered websites for the End of Term archiving partners to crawl. Librarian groups in New York City are holding nomination events to make sure important sites are preserved. And universities such as  The University of Toronto are holding events for “guerrilla archiving” focused specifically on preserving climate related data.

We need your help too! You can use the End of Term Nomination Tool to nominate any .gov or government website or social media site and it will be archived by the project team.   If you have other ideas, please comment here or send ideas to info@archive.org.   And you can also help by donating to the Internet Archive to help our continued mission to provide “Universal Access to All Knowledge.”

See: https://blog.archive.org/2016/12/15/preserving-u-s-government-websites-and-data-as-the-obama-term-ends/

The Fearless Girl

A new manifesto from State Street Global Advisors?

Pedestrians in lower Manhattan have a new piece of art to think about, as McCann New York and client State Street Global Advisors conspired in the middle of the night to drop a statue in Bowling Green Park of a girl facing off against the famous Wall Street Charging Bull.

The stunt, timed to International Women’s Day, is meant to symbolize the power of women in leadership. More specifically, it’s part of a campaign by SSGA to emphasize that companies with women in top positions perform better financially.

The sculpture, titled “The Fearless Girl,” was made by Kristen Visbal and photographed by Federica Valabrega.

The guerrilla aspect of the placement is in keeping with the Charging Bull itself, which was installed without permission by artist Arturo Di Modica in 1989. It was meant to be a symbol of the strength and power of the American people following the stock-market crash of 1987. Residents fell in love with it, and the city allowed it to remain.

McCann did get a permit for the girl statue. It will be up for at least a week, says the agency, which is negotiating with the city for it to become part of the art program so she can stay longer.

The new campaign also calls on more than 3,500 companies—the ones that SSGA invests in on behalf of clients—to take steps to increase the number of women on their corporate boards.

An MSCI study suggested companies with strong female leadership generated a return on equity of 10.1 percent per year, versus 7.4 percent for those without a critical mass of women at the top, SSGA said. Yet one in four Russell 3000 companies don’t have even one woman on their board, and nearly 60 percent of boards are less than 15 percent women.

 

Think of economics… as a doughnut

Economics is broken.

It has failed to predict, let alone prevent, financial crises that have shaken the foundations of our societies. Its out-dated theories have permitted a world in which extreme poverty persists while the wealth of the super-rich grows year on year. And its blind spots have led to policies that are degrading the living world on a scale that threatens all of our futures.

Can it be fixed? InDoughnut Economics, Kate Raworth identifies seven critical ways in which mainstream economics has led us astray, and sets out a roadmap for bringing humanity into a sweet spot that meets the needs of all within the means of the planet. In the process, she creates a new economic model that is fit for the 21st century – one in which a doughnut-shaped compass points the way to human progress.

Playful and eloquent, Doughnut Economics offers a game-changing analysis and inspiration for a new generation of economic thinkers.

The bookDoughnut Economics: seven ways to think like a 21st century economist by Kate Raworth is out on 6 April 2017. You can buy the book at all good bookshops or on Amazon UK at http://amzn.to/2laWql9 and Amazon US at http://bit.ly/DoughnutEcon

And my part in all this?  For the last 5 years I have been working with Kate Raworth on the core graphics which she used in lectures and presentations of her research papers. Just last year we worked on the updated graphics which are now in the book. If you google Doughnut Economics you’ll find the top image results will always by those graphics (as well as plenty of derivatives that it has spawned).