Rebirth of the not-magazine?

Facebook is joining a whole list of companies, from Airbnb, Asos, Casper, Dollar Shave Club to Net-a-Porter in publishing a new magazine. Except, it is a not-magazine.

Despite being packaged in the shape of a magazine, bearing all the hallmarks of a magazine and having the words “a quarterly magazine for business leaders” emblazoned on its magazine-like cover, Grow by Facebook is categorically not a magazine according to the Facebook PR team. No – this is, they say, simply a piece of marketing collateral. A brochure even. It’s almost as though Facebook doesn’t want to be called a publisher or something.

Whatever you want to call it, Grow joins an ever-expanding collection of branded publications whose arrival has coincided with major consumer titles such as NME and Teen Vogue closing their print magazines. So why is it that dead tree media is proving so desirable to companies that have built their success on eschewing legacy technology?

“Trust, authority and credibility,” says Terri White, editor-in-chief of film bible Empire. “The digital space is a hectic, loud, cluttered landscape with bloggers, influencers, journalists, editors, writers, marketeers all shouting into the void – their voices surfacing, or not, depending on SEO or algorithms. In such a crowded space, how do you ensure that people trust what they read on your website or social channels versus the other 30-odd people/brands in your area? How does your brand stand out?”


Read the full article on DRUM

Richard Reed: how to turn your passion into a career

Want to start your own business?  Founder of Innocent Drinks Richard Reed explains how it pays to be prepared when starting out a new venture.

Start working on your plan

“Turning what you love into a career can be a series of small steps, not a massive leap into the unknown. While you’ve still got your regular job, spend some of your evenings, as well as time on the weekends working on your plan. It’s a bit like being a student – you’ve got to revise and prepare.”

Learn how to make the most of your spare time

“A fair amount of time passed from the day me, Adam and John (Innocent co-founders) came up with our idea, to when we actually handed in our notice. We used our spare time to work on our business plan, and make samples to sell at market stalls. We researched the shops we thought would be interested in our product, and tried and tested as much as we could to give us confidence.”

It helps to be cheeky

“Did I always want to come home from a hard day’s work and launch myself into my plan? Of course not. There were three ways I approached it. Sometimes I just had to get on with it. Sometimes I did decide to watch TV – I’m only human. But did I sometimes work on my own stuff during my regular job, when my boss wasn’t looking? You bet.

“You have to keep within the spirit of things, and certainly never be immoral, but it helps to start thinking creatively about how to get things done.”

Keep your home out of the equation

“I would strongly advise to any aspiring entrepreneurs, who are also homeowners: don’t gamble your home. Start squirrelling away as much savings as possible so you’re not at risk of losing your home in the process. And on that note, I would advise against using your home as the guarantee for the debt to start a business, it’s too risky.”

Enjoy the benefits of doing what you love for a living

“Doing what you love provides a better quality of life, helps you take control, and attracts like-minded people.

“I’m not for one second guaranteeing that setting up your own business will go smoothly, or that you should approach a career change without a clear direction. However, with proper planning the upsides of giving it a go are infinite – you gain all that learning and experience.”

 

 

 


First published in Travelers Companies

Are you my type?

Typetoken is a new online magazine that asks you to join its journey into the symbolic world of typography. The site showcases, discusses and reviews the world of typography, icons and visual language.

A collaboration between graphic designers Mike Sullivan of Mister and Mark Milic of Modularlab, and web developer David Cole of Mayfield Digital, typetoken features contributions from designers around the globe and aims to be a source of inspiration and stimulation for those in the international design community who wish to keep abreast of what’s new and exciting in mainstream and experimental typography and iconography.

If you love type, typography or just creativity, this is for you! See Typetoken for more inspiration.

 

Your website is an investment, not an expense

Did you know that nearly 75% of nonprofits with a website designed their site in-house, used a website solution that was free, donated by a volunteer or a public agency of some sort?

Think about what this means. Three quarters of all websites in the charity sector are done on the cheap. It’s all about doing more with less. We’ve heard this expression in the not-for-profit world many times — we have to “do more with less.” It’s like the mantra of our entire sector right?

But I’m here to tell you that your nonprofit website is not an expense; it’s an investment. And when you make an investment, your focus should not be on what you’re spending as much as it should be on your ROI, or return on investment. In the commercial world, ROI is what every decision is really based on.

If I spend $100, what am I going to get back? That’s the question ROI is concerned about. Am I’m going to get $200 back? $300? Or even $101?

There’s a huge difference in mentality and approach to decision making when you’re focused on ROI as opposed to cost. I know nonprofit organisations that have spent literally £50,000 or more on their websites— and had a huge return on investment because their donations increased, their fundraising capacity grew and some of their significant expenses decreased.

I know other nonprofits that have spent £500 or less and ended up throwing their money away. In the end, all they had was basically an online brochure with next to no functionality or ways to engage with constituents.

With your website, it’s not about how much money you spend; it’s about the ROI on your expenditure. Keep in mind that your website sits right at the centre of your marketing universe. Every marketing move you make leads back to your website, and the same is true for people connected to your organisation, from constituents to board members to volunteers.

Your website is the one place where you cannot afford to do more with less.

This article was originally published on Firespring.org.