A one-page cheat sheet to your most productive 90 days ever

 

So how does this go down?

This is an interesting article from the FastCompany, though it has an odd table that makes little sense. The main thing to take from the article is:

Personal productivity and team productivity are unavoidably linked. And while companies often sit down to draw up quarterly action plans, individuals rarely do. But they should. In fact, 90 days is the perfect unit of time to make headway on your big-picture goals–and to give them the focus they need, so you and your team don’t get too overwhelmed.

Most of the projects that threaten to derail our productivity when we finally start on them have longer timelines than we imagine, making them difficult to break down into daily or weekly actions. But done right, a 90-day sprint is enough to get meaningful units of work done that collectively bring you closer to your long-term goals. And it’s still short enough that you can frequently course-correct anytime things threaten to veer off track.

STEP 1: PICK THREE THINGS TO FOCUS ON

Start by choosing a maximum of three “focus areas” for the coming quarter. Of course you’ll still have to take care of your day-to-day work, too, but these focus areas should rise above that–they’re where you think your time, talent, attention, and money are best spent on longer-term objectives during the coming quarter. Your day-to-day tasks will keep you afloat, while your focus areas will propel you ahead.

STEP 2: DECIDE HOW YOU’LL JUDGE YOUR PROGRESS

Now that you’ve picked your three focus areas for the quarter, it’s time to clarify your criteria of success for each one. This can be tricky. First, be ruthlessly realistic about what’s possible within just three months, and second, look for concrete signs of progress. It’s important to pin down criteria that are as objectively and quantitatively measurable as possible.

STEP 3: IDENTIFY WHICH STEPS TO TAKE (AND WHO’S GOING TO TAKE THEM)

Now that you’ve identified your top three focus areas and your criteria for achieving them, now it’s time to lay out how to get you there. In order to keep your plan to one page, you’ll likely have to break each focus area down into five to seven action steps and milestones. Your plan needs to be detailed enough to guide your actions but not so detailed that you feel overwhelmed or lose yourself in the minutiae.

 

Article written by: David Finkel is coauthor of the best-selling SCALE: 7 Proven Principles to Grow Your Business and Get Your Life Back.

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cguthier

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